Experience counts

No two video shoots are exactly alike.

We had a San Francisco video production gig the other day, where we were to record a conference. A group from Canada was having their user group meeting there, and they found us to record the video, and edit a promotional piece for their website. Nothing could be simpler, right? After all, we’ve done hundreds of similar events in the past.

Since this was a new venue, we scouted the location on the day prior to the shooting.

And we were glad that we did. The event was being held at the Energy Efficiency Funding Group on Mission St. To our dismay, we discovered that in the hall there was a huge concrete pillar which was standing in the middle of the room. The pillar is an internal part of the building, designed to help make the building earthquake proof (after all, this WAS a San Francisco video production we were doing).

video experience counts

 

Often we call these shoots “back of the room shoots” because that’s where we typically set up – in the back of the room. But this pillar made the standard configuration impossible. Any professional video producer will tell you this can be a challenging environment to work on but at the end of it all, it’s our job to ensure that the customer gets what she wants. .

Frankly, we had never encountered quite the same situation before, but with our years of experience and flexibility we were able to adapt, pull through the hardships and give the quality that is required.

Having the adaptability and experience allows us to know how to navigate in various environments. Those are the sorts of things that separate an amateur and a professional video producer. It is something that takes years to learn. It takes training, dedication and understanding, all skills that we have acquired and used over the years to deliver the kind of videos that our customers need.

Experience counts!

 

8 Ways to Doom Your Corporate Video Production – Mistake 6

Corporate Video Production Mistake 6.  Don’t Use a Tripod or Other Camera Support

Video production pros know that a steady camera is critical to getting a good, interesting image.  If the camera is bouncing around, the viewer gets distracted and often, annoyed.  If the viewer’s mind is busy following the subject around the screen, it won’t be concentrating on your message.

At certain times, a moving camera becomes an art form, such as is seen in music videos.  But corporate videos are typically not music videos. Keep the camera on the tripod and keep the camera movements smooth.

When the video production pros shoot, there are a wide variety of camera mounts available for image stabilization.  These include various sizes of tripods, jib arms, cranes, dollies and a Steadicam®. 

video production in ChinaThe most common camera mount is the tripod. It’s portable, easily transported, and functions well at getting most of the basic shots. It provides a stable mount for lockdown shots, zooms, pans and tilts. Here you see one in use in a video production we did outdoors in China.

 

 

 

 

video production prompter and tripod

You always want your video production tripod to be sturdy enough to support the weight of the camera and anything else that might be added to it. A good example is this prompter which goes in front of the camera so that the speaker can be looking at the words while appearing to look right at the lens.

 

 

 

video production dollyHere’s a look at a video production dolly, with the camera operator on board, and the dolly grip pushing it on tracks.  The dolly gives great smooth shots, but due to the expense of rental and the two people needed to operate it, it can be a pricey addition to the program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

video production jib armHere we are using a jib arm in preparation to making swooping and climbing shots of a store facade.  The jib can be rented in various sizes and can create an almost 3D look, as it can be made to travel in three axes above and around the subject.  It needs a trained operator.

video production steadicamWhile the jib can move extensively around a subject, for true 3D views, a Steadicam® is called for.  This is a specialized harness that needs to be used by an experienced camera operator.  It can give dramatic looks at the subject, including moving smoothly around them for 360 degrees or more. Unless you have a Steadicam® and trained operator, don’t follow your subject around with the camera – leave it to the pros.

 

 

 

The bottom line? Be sure to use a camera support to get a professional look for your corporate videos.