Getting Banned from YouTube: Your Competitor Can Do It

If you think that getting banned from YouTube is difficult, you probably play by the rules and can’t imagine how or why that would happen.

You are also being a bit naive. banned from YouTube

YouTube can be a wonderfully powerful force for businesses of all sizes in sharing their videos with the world in general, and their target audience in particular. Not only is YouTube a free, high quality storage platform for videos, thanks to it’s search parameters it helps those videos to get found. In fact, we’ve helped lots of companies accomplish this.

Think of the sheer size of YouTube:

  • The total number of people who use YouTube – 1,300,000,000.
  • 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute!
  • Almost 5 billion videos are watched on Youtube every single day.
  • YouTube gets over 30 million visitors per day

(statistics thanks to fortunelords.com)

Over the course of its development, YouTube has evolved into a platform with a large set of rules and regulations to be followed by people uploading a video.

A YouTube channel owner has to be aware of the hazards of using this usually reliable marketing asset.

If you have a video channel which supports your website or business, you have to not only be very careful with YouTube policies, but be prepared to defend them. You could get banned from YouTube without any prior notice.

We saw this happen recently when the channel owned by Legal Insurrection was banned from YouTube.

The channel was removed without any prior notice based on third-party claims of copyright infringement. Although these claims were submitted by a political rival, the fact that the channel was banned from YouTube was so complete that even original videos created by the channel owner were banned by YouTube.

Fox News reported this ban on the channel imposed by YouTube, without any notice and can be read in detail here. Despite your political views, the fact that this could happen so quickly, completely and unjustifiably should be a concern for all channel owners.

So this should serve as warning to all YouTube channel owners that they too could be banned from YouTube and a substantial marketing asset eliminated, simply because of a complaint by anyone  – including a competitor.

Therefore, it is important to be extremely careful while uploading your content so your competitors can make no third party complain of copyright infringement or any other irregularity against you. Here are some additional suggestions that you can adhere to in order to stay on the right side of YouTube laws:

Only use content that you own or produced

This is obvious – if you don’t own the video or have the right to do with it as you please, it may get banned from YouTube. the process for your competition to dispute your ownership is very easy, do don’t give them the opportunity. This is the easiest way to get banned from YouTube. The only way that you can use content of others on YouTube is to use videos marked “creative commons.” That gives you the go-ahead to use the footage.

Thumbnails

YouTube gives channel owner the choice of three possible thumbnails, which are random images from the video as it is uploaded. We urge channel owners to use their own custom thumbnails. While deciding the thumbnail for your YouTube video, be careful. A misleading picture which attracts a user to see the video may go undetected by the YouTube algorithm but will surely be picked up by your competitor. Therefore, add relevant thumbnail pictures that apply to the actual content of the video.

Don’t get software to generate traffic

For several years, channel owners could  purchase views, likes and subscribers for their YouTube videos. They have figured that out and now the ability to uncover such trickery, and it will get you banned from YouTube quickly.

Video description

Write a long and ample video description of 500 words or more. Explain your involvement in the creation of the YouTube video. This will cement your ownership claims.

Read the fine print

In order to save you the hassle of trying to restore a channel that has been banned by Youtube, read the fine print before clicking on the “accept” button. Knowing the rules and regulations will make you less probable of breaking them without knowing.

As a subsidiary of Google, YouTube follows the policy of making it very difficult to speak with a real human being.

So it is difficult to rectify the situation if you are banned from YouTube. Our recommendation for a fail-safe solution is to be sure that you have all of your videos backed up on other media. If the worst happens, you can re-upload all of the videos to a new channel. But since you would lose all the prior views, likes, comments, etc. it is best to avoid the situation in the first place.

Postscript

The Legal Insurrection channel has been reinstated after much pressure. But it took a lot of work on the part of the channel owner, something we all want to avoid.

Now About Your On-camera Message

Tips for improving your on-camera message

Recently I read an article in Men’s Health Magazine (I know, I know, but stick with me here). I thought that several of the points made were valid in the article at “13 Insanely Simple Ways to be More Likable.” It occurred to me that several of these items can also be related to delivering a great on-camera message.

We cover many tips for what to wear on camera, but these relate to how you address the camera.

I was especially impressed by points #6, 7, 8, 12, 13 in the article, and they are listed below.

In our years of producing video productions we often have CEOs and other C-level executives deliver staged on-camera messages and presentations to their employees (we usually edit the presentation and it gets uploaded to our client’s internal website) and some come off better than others. In fact, when we shoot live events and record their speeches to the live audience for later distribution as an on-camera message, the same principle applies.

So those points in the article are totally congruent with some of the things they can do to improve their message on camera.

on-camera messageWe are often told that it is important not to judge a book by its cover; however, many of us make up our minds about a person on the first initial impression. If on-camera messages play a role in your job, then it is imperative that you know how to present yourself well on screen if you want to improve your on-camera message.

Some people naturally come across well when it comes to presenting themselves to an audience while others struggle to look natural or relaxed on camera. The following tips will help you to improve your on-camera presentation.

1. Don’t cross your arms

When someone crosses their arms over their body, it makes them appear standoffish and unfriendly. This kind of body language makes a person look unapproachable and difficult to relate to; it might also seem rude. Many people use this type of body language when they are nervous, so make a conscious effort to relax and make sure that your palms are open and facing the camera while you talk.

2. Smile

Smiling is a simple enough gesture, but many of us forget to smile, especially when we are tense. A smile makes you appear warm, friendly and approachable; don’t be afraid to use a smile in your presentation when it is appropriate and you’ll help your audience to feel at ease.

3. Try Positive Thinking

If you are uncomfortable at presentation then this will show in the way you come across to your audience. Some people are better presenters than others, but don’t let this thought overwhelm you and don’t get caught up in negative feelings over how you might appear on screen.
Concentrate on delivering your message in a clear and concise way and use all of the positive aspects of your personality to get your message across and engage with the audience.

4. Make eye contact

Of course, the camera doesn’t have an eye, but the lens functions as one. When you are presenting to the camera, look straight at the lens. This can help you to appear confident and the audience will find it easier to engage with you. Using eye (lens) contact can help the audience to feel like they have a connection with you and they are more likely to listen to your on-camera message.

5. Be Yourself

People know when someone is giving a false impression. Don’t try and be outgoing, witty and entertaining if that doesn’t reflect your persona or style. Most people are pretty savvy and if an individual’s presentation appears contrived, they will notice. Play to your own strengths and use them to convey your message with clarity.

 

Obstacles to Video Marketing Success

Recently we read about video marketing success in a report that was published in June 2014 entitled “B2B Video Marketing: B2B Benchmarks and Best Practices.”

This report was produced by Demand Metric Research Corporation in partnership with Ascend2, and it was sponsored by VidYard. video marketing success as found in demand metric study The report was a study in which 398 marketing sales and business professionals worldwide were polled regarding their use and video marketing successes with B2B videos. And all of the respondents had either used video for BtoB marketing or were planning to.

There were a number of interesting findings in the study.

One included what the respondents felt were the obstacles to video marketing success. We were dismayed (but not surprised) to read that 47% of the people responding to the survey cited a lack of budget for their video has an obstacle. Fully another 45% indicated a lack of in-house resources or a problem.

I suspect strongly that these two categories are both largely the same respondents to the survey.

Creating compelling content was another major factor users said was another obstacle to video marketing success.  To us this merely underscores the fact that many of the people in the B2B marketing world do have an understanding of the need for Media Marketing, but do not have a strong comprehension of what it takes to create a successful video. In the remainder of the study, B2B marketers indicate strong understanding of the process. This indicates that they know how to what to do with the videos once they have been created.  However it did not seem that many of them on grasped what was necessary to create those videos in the first place.

As a professional video production company, our job is to lower those barriers of entry to B2B marketers who realize the need for good strong videos.

Obviously if they do not understand how to get them created efficiently and effectively, they are not going to continue with the video production process. The plain truth of the matter is that many videos are not very expensive to make and instead can be produced at a price that’s returns a great ROI. Many videos such as this one below have in the relatively simple production cycle and do not require extensive (if any) use of video cameras and the recording of video and audio on location or in the studio. As you can see in this video we have not used a video camera to create the visual images necessary to communicate, yet it is a video marketing success. Instead we use the video editing process to merge graphics, narration and music. We also have the ability to use stock footage in video production as well, also avoiding the need to hire a camera and crew.

The primary challenge begins with the lack of an effective media strategy before beginning the video.

And as it turns out this was the fourth greatest obstacle to video marketing success as defined in the study. In fact 33% of the B2B marketers realize that they lacked an effective strategy. This indicates some awareness of the problem, however a full 26% of the of people who responded suggested that producing studio quality video was also an obstacle to video marketing success as mentioned above. Studio quality video is NOT necessary in order to effectively communicate the message and of course this is particularly important when budgets are limited. So if we may be so humble we would like to suggest that you contact us at Penrose Productions so that we can discuss with you ways in which the video production process can be effective for you and maximize your ROI.  Time after time we have seen that he budgets do not have to be nearly as high as you fear.

YouTube Video: Making your Video Go Viral

YouTube Videos rule the internet and there is no better platform for making your video go viral.

Going viral is a universal, if lofty goal for just about any YouTube video. However, it takes large portions of both skill and luck to have the video get millions of hits. Especially so in the arena of business videos. But are millions of hits necessarily the goal?

In this excellent cartoon from Scott Adams, Dilbert has an accurate assessment of what it takes to create a viral video, while the third (unidentified) person at the table has the luck to be in the right place at the right time.

viral YouTube video

One of the key panels is #5 where Dilbert shares that he has no relevant skills for the assignment his pointy-haired boss is giving him. We’ve commented often, business video quality is key and best left to the pros. That’s what we’ve been providing clients in Silicon Valley and around the world for over three decades.

But since we consider ourselves to be your YouTube video partners when we undertake a project, we’d like to share some insights on getting your YouTube video seen by others.

First you have to define the goal and the audience for your YouTube video. What good does it do to have 5 million hits when they come from viewers who couldn’t care less about purchasing your business’s product or service?

So it’s a matter of scale as to what defines “viral.” For example, if you are marketing in the BtoB space to a specialized product or service through your YouTube video that has a potential universe of 5,000 engineers throughout the world, 1,000 views would be a great accomplishment.

On WikiHow they have a list of 10 steps for How to Make a Viral Video. The problem with the article is that it does not go into any detail for the ten steps. However, there is a key point in item #4 that is worth noting – you need to have is video that is at least one of these six, plus the last one:

  • Unique
  • Funny
  • Stupid
  • Dangerous
  • Strange/Weird
  • Gross
  • Worth talking about

We particularly like the last one — the YouTube video has to be worth talking about. At least in the community that is your audience.

If the video can also accomplish some of the other characteristics, fine, but we don’t typically produce professional videos that are stupid, dangerous or gross. For some odd reason, those don’t often seem compatible with a professional business YouTube video.

If your business is in the consumer marketplace, then the elements of storytelling, excitement, etc. become much more important. Again, the target market must always be kept in mind, but the goal for consumers is to get them to SHARE the video.

This is an excellent article on creating consumer viral videos. But again,we come back to the need to have your video produced by a professional. As Dilbert noted above, you have to be trained and experienced — don’t try this at home!

But remember, even if you become a YouTube video master, there is no guarantee that you will make money from your video.

Monetization is in important part of the goals we mentioned above, and for the majority of businesses to goal is to engage and inform potential buyers about your products or services so that they will want to do business with you.

 

 

 

 

Video Production: Should you Hire it Out?

Video production is an essential marketing tactic for those in business.

Video production is becoming increasingly important in the marketing mix for businesses of all sizes. In fact, in a Cisco white paper on the future of internet traffic, they say “Globally, consumer Internet video traffic will be 69 percent of all consumer Internet traffic in 2017, up from 57 percent in 2012. This percentage does not include video exchanged through peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing. The sum of all forms of video (TV, video on demand [VoD], Internet, and P2P) will be in the range of 80 to 90 percent of global consumer traffic by 2017.”

The marketer who disregards this video trend is doomed to become a dinosaur, regardless of the industry or size of company.

I recently read a fascinating book by Perry Marshall that expands on the widely known 80/20 Theory of Richard Koch. It’s focus is on the implications for sales and marketing.

Marshall’s 2013 book “80/20 Sales and Marketing: the Definitive Guide to Working Less and Making More” explores the Pareto Principle and it’s many applications throughout life in general as well as business.

Pareto PrincipleIn it Marshall emphasizes the “power curve” and it’s many implications. This graph, for example, shows how 80% of church donations (time and money) come from 20% of the members. 

The same principle applies to the use of one’s time as a business owner, manager, or other position of responsibility. Using this curve/pattern to track important (e.g. high paying) tasks, we find that those fall to the right of the graph where all peak performances are charted.

The message is clear that people should try to operate as efficiently as possible, avoiding low value tasks.

Any good manager knows this and will offload as many chores as possible to be more productive. It’s a basic time management tool. However, the key lies not in how much to offload, but what.

Good managers and business owners don’t waste time on tasks for which they are not excellent.

From a video production perspective, the obvious point is to hire professionals to do that work. While current technology is terrifically affordable and easy to use, managers are still not the best people to do the video production work.

And yet we see it time and again in video production. Managers and business owners who would no sooner empty their own waste basket or paint the offices (or any other task of which they are capable) will try to do video.

Could it be because video production is fun?

Admittedly, we do enjoy our work. But video production, like any serious element of a marketing strategy, must be approached thoughtfully and with understanding. We have this picture of one of our video production shoots on the wall in our office:

video production maui sunset

When new clients see it, the first question is “Is that Maui?” When we answer yes, they always comment, “You got to do video production work in Maui? You are SO lucky!”

Truth be known, when we shot a video for the Napili Kai Beach Club there, it was non-stop from early morning to dusk, for 5 solid days. To quote Steve Erwin (RIP) “we were sweatin’ bullets mate!” The weather was very warm (of course, it’s Hawaii) and we needed to get shots all day while the sun was in different positions and affecting lighting. We had dozens of set-ups and tear downs to capture the many different types of rooms and facilities on he property. Despite appearances, it was not fun…

Often, a company will try doing their own video production once, and when they discover the hassles or low quality, they come to us.

This can be to fix the video production that they tried to do themselves, or because of deadlines, the next video production they do. Tough lesson learned…

We welcome the chance to put managers and business owners back in the “power curve” by taking video production off their plate. We even have a directorial-only service where we direct your video production efforts so you can have the “fun.”

 

Posted 10/22/13

 

8 ways to doom your corporate video production – Conclusion

Mistakes That Will Ruin Your Video Production – Conclusion

With video production as with all things, the motto is “If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing well” And this applies to your video productions.  But there are times when a large full scale production is not warranted.  Fortunately, it is no longer a matter of all or nothing when it comes to bringing professional production values to your work. 

You do not have to spend tens of thousands of dollars for a video production.

inexpensive video production

It surprises many people that are considering a video production that there is an efficient middle ground that can be used.  This can be a tremendous cost saver.  This includes hiring one or more professionals to assist.  This could be:

  • ·        a producer/director to oversee your production,
  • ·        a lighting director with equipment,
  • ·        a teleprompter operator with equipment,
  • ·        a make-up artist to make your executive look “just right”
  • ·        an editor to bring together the footage you’ve shot into a crisp, effective program,
  • ·        a graphic artist or animator to punch up your graphics,
  • ·        a duplication facility to make mass quantities of your videotape, DVD or CD

Through the use of experienced professionals in some or all areas of your next production, you can ensure that you create a program that meets your objectives in an efficient and effective way.

8 ways to doom your corporate video production – Mistake 8

MISTAKE 8.  LETTING YOUR IN-HOUSE “TALENT” JUST WING IT

Let’s face it, your co-workers are not professional actors, and they need some help to remember all the things they need to say and do on camera.  I discussed this recently with another producer friend of mine, and he commented, “If I had a nickel for every time I shot an exec who said he could just talk off the top of his head…  What disasters!”

I agree.  Use a teleprompter.  We’ve shown these in blog posts, and here it is again. This speaker standing in front of the green screen will be looking up at the camera and delivering his script.

video production prompter

In this shoot with Steve Young, he’ll be addressing the camera using the prompter that our crew member is adjusting.

prompter for Steve Young

As you can see, the prompter mounts in front of the camera.  Your executive or employee can look right at the camera and read the words as if he were looking into the lens.  After a couple of practice runs, amateurs are almost always comfortable enough to blast right through the script.  It’s money well spent as it means faster shooting, less errors, and fewer frayed nerves.

And if your executive looks stiff or really doesn’t like the feel of “reading” the words, we can put up bullet points or PowerPoint slides on the prompter so that he or she can still appear to be looking at the audience.  This avoids the problem of the presenter looking away to notes or cue cards and looking “shifty eyed” as a result.

 

 

8 ways to doom your corporate video production – Mistake 7

VIDEO PRODUCTION MISTAKE 7. USE THE CAMERA MICROPHONE TO RECORD THE AUDIO

You can see in video production that the rapid improvement and compactness of video is also manifested in the audio that accompanies it. Camcorders today record excellent sound. But there is a problem.

The problem is that the sound source closest to the camcorder microphone will be recorded best. And this may not be what you want recorded.

Have you ever set up a camcorder in the back of the room to record a live seminar for your corporate video production and listened to the result? Isn’t it amazing how the comments, coughs and collisions in the back of the room sound so clear – and the speaker is unintelligible at those points?

I simply can’t count the number of times people have come to us to ask if we can enhance the audio from just such presentations, and other live events as well. In short, the answer is unfortunately “No.” We can not bring out audio that essentially is not there.

What is the solution? First, you must have a camcorder that will take an external microphone input. If yours doesn’t, get another one.

After that, it’s all just a matter of microphone placement. If you have just one speaker in your video production, you should invest in a lavaliere microphone for the presenter to wear. The mic is then in place less than a foot from the presenter’s mouth and will record clear audio.

Here I am placing a lavaliere mic on blues guitarist B.B. King prior to shooting a TV commercial. In this case, the microphone will be hidden from view. I’m tucking it under his collar, out of sight.

microphone for BB King

Another option would have been to use a mic on a boom pole just out of frame as we did for football Hall of Famer Steve Young. Here a boom operator holds the mic on a boom pole becuase Steve is walking and talking, so the mic has to move with him.

boom microphone for Steve YoungHere’s another example of a boom operator holding the mic above the talent in this corporate training video production with actors.prod16If the speaker in your video production is stationary, the boom mic can be anchored just above and out of camera view. In addition to giving a consistent level of audio, it eliminates the need for another person to operate the boom.

boom microphone over child actor

If possible when buying or renting a lavaliere, get a good wireless microphone. Don’t defeat the purpose by getting a cheap microphone that feeds buzzes and hisses to your recording system. A pair of decent, yet inexpensive headphones will let you listen to the audio that you are getting. If you don’t get a clean signal, take the microphone back to the store and get one that works for you.

Prices for good quality mics have come down dramatically over the years, so if you are going to do much of this type of “talking head” recording, it’s worth the small investment.

Microphones are obviously not just for amplification. You need a good mic close to the subject to get good clear audio.

 

8 ways to doom your corporate video production – Mistake 6

CORPORATE VIDEO PRODUCTION MISTAKE 6.  DON’T USE A TRIPOD OR OTHER CAMERA SUPPORT

Video production pros know that a steady camera is critical to getting a good, interesting image.  If the camera is bouncing around, the viewer gets distracted and often, annoyed.  If the viewer’s mind is busy following the subject around the screen, it won’t be concentrating on your message.

At certain times, a moving camera becomes an art form, such as is seen in music videos.  But corporate videos are typically not music videos. Keep the camera on the tripod and keep the camera movements smooth.

When the video production pros shoot, there are a wide variety of camera mounts available for image stabilization.  These include various sizes of tripods, jib arms, cranes, dollies and a Steadicam®. 

The most common camera mount is the tripod. It’s portable, easily transported, and functions well at getting most of the basic shots. It provides a stable mount for lock down shots, zooms, pans and tilts. Here you see one in use in a video production we did outdoors in France.

video production in France

You always want your video production tripod to be sturdy enough to support the weight of the camera and anything else that might be added to it. A good example is this prompter which goes in front of the camera so that the speaker can be looking at the words while appearing to look right at the lens.

video production tripod and prompter

Here’s a look at a video production dolly, with the camera operator on board, and the dolly grip pushing it on tracks.  The dolly gives great smooth shots, but due to the expense of rental and the two people needed to operate it, it can be a pricey addition to the program.

video production dolly

Below we are using a jib arm in preparation to making swooping and climbing shots of a store facade.  The jib can be rented in various sizes and can create an almost 3D look, as it can be made to travel in three axes above and around the subject.  It needs a trained operator.

video production jib arm

Another less intimidating arm would be a smaller version of the jib which allows the camera operator to raise or lower the shot smoothly. This is called “pedding up” or “pedding down” short for raising or lowering the pedestal of the camera. This move is different from tiliting up or down with a tripod. Also, this mount is easily mastered and requires less training than the large jib arm.

small video production jib

While the jib can move extensively around a subject, for true 3D views, a Steadicam® is called for.  This is a specialized harness that needs to be used by an experienced camera operator.  It can give dramatic looks at the subject, including moving smoothly around them for 360 degrees or more. Unless you have a Steadicam® and trained operator, don’t follow your subject around with the camera – leave it to the pros.

video production steadicam

 

 

8 ways to doom your corporate video production – Mistake 5

MISTAKE 5.  SKIP THE LIGHTING AND OTHER EQUIPMENT THAT WILL REALLY MAKE THE IMAGE “POP” IN A CORPORATE VIDEO PRODUCTION

When it comes to corporate video production, the current level of electronic technology is truly extraordinary.  Home camcorders are easy to use and affordable, and everyone fancies himself or herself a TV director.  But as good as these cameras have become, a professional, high-impact look will only come when additional lighting and other equipment are applied.  Even current reality shows are supplemented by lots of lighting instruments and other gear specially designed to make the shots look good. 

Knowing how to light is a complete art and science unto itself.  If you were to review the movie credits at the end of a major motion picture (without animation or special effects) over half the people would be involved in lighting and related areas to make the image look just right.

Of course, we’re talking corporate video production; we’re not trying to duplicate “Gone with the Wind. But remember that the image that you show, is the image that represents YOU.

In addition to lighting instruments, some of the gear that might be called into play includes soft lights, gels, reflectors, bounce cards, cookies, scrims and light diffusion.  You can see a couple of these here: 

corporate video production using a steadicam

In the above shoot we did, starring Steve Young of 49er fame, you can see 2 big soft lights as the primary lighting source.  We have also have other “harder” (e.g. not soft) lights out of frame – including fill and back lights.

The light cutter at the top center is used to keep too much light from flooding the background.

In the picture, note the large reflector to the right that one man is adjusting.  This is used to redirect sunlight for an outdoor shoot. Another man runs the fog machine for a dream-like effect. Finally,  

corporate video producting using a video reflector                                 

While this array of lighting and grip equipment is typically not available for shooting corporate video on your own, it can enhance the image dramatically.  And if your budget does not allow a complete video production crew to shoot the video, freelance lighting directors with rental equipment are available, and that could give a corporate video production a look that will set it apart from other more amateurish efforts.