Silicon Valley Video: Another Past Client Calls on Penrose

We’ve recently produced a Silicon Valley video for a client who found us after 20 years.

As we reported earlier this summer, we had a Silicon valley video production client come back to us after not doing video for 20 years. We’re proud to say that it’s happened again.

A couple of weeks ago, lightning struck a second time and we were called upon by a past (and now current) Silicon Valley video production client. The client had moved on to another firm (or two or three) in the meantime and he remembered us.  But this time they were in a rush.

Judging by their past history as our Silicon Valley video production client, they knew who to call.

sillicon valley video shootThe task was to shoot, edit and output the product video in less than a week. This included narration in both English and Mandarin. Despite the tight deadline of a week, we were able to do the complete production within that time frame. Here we are on location at the client’s office.

So you want to know about the product? Sorry, we’re under NDA and the video was delivered for the client on the web and as a DVD. The company has already featured the video in their booth in Chna.

So if you need a video fast, if you need it good and you want someone to keep your company information to themselves, you’ve come to the right place.

Penrose Productions is the leader of Silicon Valley video production – call today at 650-969-8273

Posted 10/22/13

Fun San Jose Video Production is done

This San Jose video for a small business was lots of fun to create.

We often produce San Jose video productions, as well as those in San Francisco, or around the world. And it’s always lots of fun when we get to express our creativity.

In my blog post of July 3 about a fun video production for San Jose-based Abbey Carpets, we indicated we’d be sharing the video once completed.  It’s up on YouTube now and we’re happy to let you see it.

The challenge was to create a marketing video for Abbey Carpets/Blossom Valley Interiors in San Jose. We used footage from a video camera that shoots at a very low frame rate, so that when the video is played back at normal speed everything is in fast motion.

Using that footage as a basis, we constructed a story around the old-time movie format that it suggested. By using the “before” footage in black and white, we added title cards, film scratches and ragtime piano music in the edit.

Kudos to Steve Delamore and the entire staff at Abbey who embraced the process and trusted our professional judgement for the creation of this video.

Now that the video is up on YouTube, it’s time to leverage the power of YouTube videos for search engine optimization. It will take awhile to get this San Jose video ranking on the front page for competitive keywords such as “San Jose Flooring” but already after just 2 days for the term “Karndean San Jose” this video is the #2 ranked organic search on Google:

 

San Jose Video SEO

 

 

 

Video Production the Fun Way

We love a video production that inspires us to get creative.

We’ve done an awful lot of video productions in our 30+ years in the San Francisco Bay Area.

As with any job or profession, the work varies from the mundane to the truly exciting. And like others we revel in the opportunity to do a video production that is flat out fun — and get paid to do it

We’ve done lots of video productions over the years, but the trend for quite a while has been away from that as companies feel they can’t afford to appear frivolous.

We just put the finishing touches on the first edit of a marketing video for Abbey Carpets/Blossom Valley Interiors in San Jose.

Owner Steve Delamore is one of those business owners that is truly marketing-focused and he realizes the need to do videos as part of his marketing mix. And we love how he lets us get creative with the vision.

In this particular case Steve wanted to highlight the opening of the new Karndean Design Center in his store. His store is the only one in Santa Clara County where such a center exists, and his goal is to use it as a great competitive advantage.

He actually had to close his store for a week to install the design center and when he told us that he was going to do so, we suggested that we create a video production around it. We further helped him find a video camera that shoots at a very low frame rate, so that when the video is played back at normal speed everything is in fast motion.

We suggested that he set up the camera in a fixed location in the store and keep it running during the installation.

Steve did that and got some very cool video footage of the installers and workers scurrying around.

Watching the fast motion inspired us to create a script done in the style of an old time silent movie, complete with black and white footage, film scratches, title cards and piano music in the background.

Steve approved and embraced the video production concept wholeheartedly.

Here is the finished video:

Fun and creative video production projects like this one are too few and far between, but they serve as a source for great satisfaction and inspiration when they come along.

And we’re always going to be on the lookout for more.

 

 

8 ways to doom your corporate video production – Mistake 7

VIDEO PRODUCTION MISTAKE 7. USE THE CAMERA MICROPHONE TO RECORD THE AUDIO

You can see in video production that the rapid improvement and compactness of video is also manifested in the audio that accompanies it. Camcorders today record excellent sound. But there is a problem.

The problem is that the sound source closest to the camcorder microphone will be recorded best. And this may not be what you want recorded.

Have you ever set up a camcorder in the back of the room to record a live seminar for your corporate video production and listened to the result? Isn’t it amazing how the comments, coughs and collisions in the back of the room sound so clear – and the speaker is unintelligible at those points?

I simply can’t count the number of times people have come to us to ask if we can enhance the audio from just such presentations, and other live events as well. In short, the answer is unfortunately “No.” We can not bring out audio that essentially is not there.

What is the solution? First, you must have a camcorder that will take an external microphone input. If yours doesn’t, get another one.

After that, it’s all just a matter of microphone placement. If you have just one speaker in your video production, you should invest in a lavaliere microphone for the presenter to wear. The mic is then in place less than a foot from the presenter’s mouth and will record clear audio.

Here I am placing a lavaliere mic on blues guitarist B.B. King prior to shooting a TV commercial. In this case, the microphone will be hidden from view. I’m tucking it under his collar, out of sight.

microphone for BB king

Another option would have been to use a mic on a boom pole just out of frame as we did for football Hall of Famer Steve Young. Here a boom operator holds the mic on a boom pole becuase Steve is walking and talking, so the mic has to move with him.

boom microphone for Steve Young

Here’s another example of a boom operator holding the mic above the talent in this corporate training video production with actors.

boom microphone for actors

If the speaker in your video production is stationary, the boom mic can be anchored just above and out of camera view. In addition to giving a consistent level of audio, it eliminates the need for another person to operate the boom.

boom microphone over child actor

If possible when buying or renting a lavaliere, get a good wireless microphone. Don’t defeat the purpose by getting a cheap microphone that feeds buzzes and hisses to your recording system. A pair of decent, yet inexpensive headphones will let you listen to the audio that you are getting. If you don’t get a clean signal, take the microphone back to the store and get one that works for you.

Prices for good quality mics have come down dramatically over the years, so if you are going to do much of this type of “talking head” recording, it’s worth the small investment.

Microphones are obviously not just for amplification. You need a good mic close to the subject to get good clear audio.